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 Type 22 Class frigate

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Sam 8 Mar 2008 - 8:23

6 Mar 2008

Pressure Is On As Royal Navy Warship Is Put Through Its Paces in Portland

Royal Navy warship HMS Chatham will sail into Portland this weekend (7-10 March 2008) for a high profile twist on the Royal Navy’s sea training.

Under the watchful eye of the Navy’s Flag Officer Sea Training (FOST) staff, every aspect of Chatham’s procedures and routines will be scrutinised over Saturday and Sunday.

The 5,300 tonne Type 22 frigate will be judged on her performance handling a real life series of public events, including entertaining local civic dignitaries, hosting an evening presentation and allowing the general public to come onboard.

On Friday, the ship’s company will also welcome onboard members of the local branch of the Royal British Legion, Probus, the Round Table and Rotary Club for an evening presentation and capability demonstration.

The aim of the demonstration is to both entertain and educate. Traditional Naval hospitality is combined with a ship’s tour which involves a series of ‘live’ stances telling an operational story, for example boarding a suspect vessel in a high threat environment and explaining the ship’s role and procedures in carrying out this mission.

The Commanding Officer of HMS Chatham, Commander Martin Connell, will also host a lunch for guests including Mr Bruce Bonwell (President of the Rotary Club of Portland), Mr Jim Chapman (President of Portland Probus), Major General Richard Keightley CB (President of Royal British Legion Dorset), Mr Malcolm Russel (Chairman of Sandford Royal British Legion) and Commodore Jamie Miller CBE Royal Navy (The Naval Regional Commander, Wales and Western England).

Whilst she is in Portland, HMS Chatham will be open to the public on Sunday, 9 March from 2.00pm to 4.00pm. Always a popular attraction, it gives visitors a chance to learn more about life on the ocean waves and what it is like to live and work onboard a warship. Admission is free. Whilst alongside in the Netherlands recently, Chatham welcomed on board over 6,000 visitors in 2 days!

Commander Connell said: “This visit to Portland is an essential element of our meticulous preparations for our forthcoming deployment. The training is designed to test the ship’s company to its limits, both physically and mentally, and prepare us to successfully respond to any situation, whether it is defending ourselves, boarding a merchant ship in support of United Nations sanctions or carrying out humanitarian first aid assistance in the event of natural disasters.

HMS Chatham returned home at the end of last year following a successful deployment to the Mediterranean and Adriatic, where she participated in a major exercise with a huge task group of 40 foreign ships and intensive training with other nations’ navies, including the biennial Egyptian Exercise Bright Star. The exercise was aimed at furthering military relations with Egypt and included ships and submarines from the United States, Italy, Greece, Pakistan, Turkey and French Mirage fighter jets.

HMS Chatham received world-wide recognition for her humanitarian efforts in the aftermath of the Tsunami, and was recently awarded the ‘Firmin Sword of Peace’ for her work – an annual award in the UK to the unit that has made the best contribution towards good community relations at home or abroad. Chatham was also present at the handover of Hong Kong, starred in the BBC series ‘Shipmates’ and was the lead ship in the Trafalgar 200 celebrations.

HMS Chatham, along with sister ships Cumberland, Campbeltown and Cornwall, is equipped with a formidable array of weapon systems including Seawolf Anti-Air Missiles, a 4.5” Automated Gun, Goalkeeper Close in Weapons System (CWIS), Harpoon anti-ship missiles and an array of close range weapons. She also carries the very latest Mk 8 Lynx helicopter that can carry anti-ship SeaSkua missiles, Stingray Torpedoes, depth charges and a powerful machine gun, as well as being invaluable for transferring personnel and stores.

Originally designed as specialist anti-submarine platforms, the Type 22 frigates have evolved into powerful surface combatants with excellent command, control and communication facilities, making them ideal Flagships. On patrol they have an efficient cruising speed of 18 knots, and a sprint capability of over 30 knots.


[Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Mer 7 Mai 2008 - 8:13

6th May 2008

Campbeltown Hands Baton to Chatham in the Northern Arabian Gulf

Devonport frigate, HMS Chatham has relieved her sister ship HMS Campbeltown from maritime security duties in the Northern Arabian Gulf, retaining the Royal Navy’s presence in this vital region.

The ‘older sister’ has completed a highly successful, intensive tour of the NAG, which has lasted 4 months.

As well as the family ties of being near identical Batch III Type 22 Frigates, both vessels share the same West Country base port.

The Royal Navy plays a key role in the Gulf as part of a multi-national coalition task force conducting Maritime Security Operations, maintaining lawful use of the maritime environment and denying it as a venue for illegal activity by international terrorist organisations.

The main aim is to provide protection to the two key Iraqi oil platforms which generate around 93% of Iraq’s income. Coalition and Iraqi vessels provide security 24 hours a day 365 days a year, in a congested area of water where the traffic ranges from local small fishing dhows up to vast oil tankers. In addition the Coalition is working hard to assist and train the Iraqi Navy to eventually assume the role itself.

The ‘sisters’ conducted the handover alongside in Bahrain, home of the United Kingdom Maritime Component Command, Combined Maritime Forces and US Navy Fifth Fleet, over a 24 hour period in which Campbeltown gave her counterparts as much up-to-date information as possible to enable them to slot seamlessly into place.

HMS Campbeltown’s Operations Officer, Lt Rob Brann said: “Conducting a thorough handover is absolutely essential to ensure continuity in this vital task. The Ship’s Company has worked hard to support the Coalition over recent months and in particular since January when we began operating in the NAG. It is important to give HMS Chatham all the information she needs to ensure the Iraqi oil platforms continue to get the best possible protection.”

The Ship’s Commanding Officer, Commander Gordon Abernethy, Royal Navy added: “There is no doubt we have had a tremendously successful deployment, we have now handed the baton to Chatham and wish them the very best of luck. We are now on the last leg of our deployment and are understandably very much looking forward to getting home to see our families and friends.”

HMS Campbeltown sailed from Plymouth for the Gulf in October 2007 and completed two months assigned to Operation Calash operating off East Africa and in the Northern Arabian Sea to counter terrorism, piracy and smuggling. In the New Year she took over duties in the NAG and has been protecting the oil platforms for the last 4 months. The ship arrives back in the UK on 23 May 08.

HMS Chatham sailed from Devonport on 31 March and will be away from the UK six and a half. Taking the baton from Campbeltown, Chatham’s Commanding Officer, Cdr Martin Connell said: “We are taking over one of the most important missions the Royal Navy is currently undertaking. Campbeltown has had an extremely successful deployment and has now given us an excellent handover. My crew are ready to undertake the task and we relish the challenge ahead”.


Chatham and Campbeltown in handover. [Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Mer 28 Mai 2008 - 8:20

27th May 2008

Plymouth Frigate Home From Gulf

There were emotional scenes on the jetty when more than 600 of families and friends greeted their loved ones on Devonport-based Royal Navy warship HMS Campbeltown - home today (Friday 23 May) after a seven-month deployment.

Joyous crowds cheered, cried with joy and waved banners complete with loving messages and pictures of their missed family and friends as the frigate tied up in Devonport accompanied by a Royal Marine Band.

HMS Campbeltown has been part of the Royal Navy’s presence East of Suez and during the deployment the ship has been conducting Operation Calash and Operation Telic duties in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Northern Arabian Gulf. The crew are now set to enjoy four weeks of well-earned leave.

Thomas Gill, 22, of Partington, Manchester, was greeted by a party including his aunt Julie and sister Charmain, his girlfriend Lianne, cousin Terelle, nephew Harrison, age four, dad Tommy and mother Julie and nan Joan. This was his first deployment on a ship after training at HMS Raleigh. As a warfare specialist Thomas worked in the operations room giving a picture of the

Many boats that crowd the Gulf and who had to be checked in case they posed a threat to the oil production platforms or the naval task forces protecting the oil field and sea lanes.

Thomas said: “It was my first deployment and just as exciting as I expected. I really enjoyed it and making loads of good mates. But it was tough being away from my family.”

Thomas, who worked for a building society, before joining the Royal Navy to ‘do something for his country’, will now enjoy a giant party organised by his family.
Lianne said: “It’s great to have him back.“

One of the most emotional sailors on board was Chef Dave Trotter, 53, who is not only leaving his last warship of his career, but also leaving the Navy (after his leave) after 30 years’ eventful service during which his ship HMS Ardent was sunk during the Falklands Conflict. He has three children, all in the Royal Navy, Susan Shipley, of 40 Commando, Stephen, a steward in HMS Cattistock, and Mike, a leading photographer.

Warrant Officer David Riis-White, was met by his wife Inger and daughter Ellen, 13, of Plymouth. He said: “We were doing a very worthwhile job out there in the Gulf and we did it very well. It was very intense with a heavy workload. But it is fantastic to be back with my family. I am looking forward to supporting Ellen again with her sports.”

Ellen said: “I am so happy dad is back again. I do biathlons, swimming and running and have an event his weekend for him to be there with me.”
More/…
Sarah Williams greeted her husband the Executive Officer Lieutenant Commander Colin Williams with their daughters Isabelle, 9, and Hermione, 7, who waved their home made banner greeting their father.

Sarah said: “It has been a long time without Colin and very hard, but this is a very happy day.” Isabelle said: “I have missed daddy and want to see him again.”

Adam South, 24, of Devonport, Plymouth, is a communicator on board HMS Campbeltown who communicates with other ships to check their security status. He said: “This was my first ship after training at HMS Raleigh. It was a great experience - just as I was hoping and more.”

Adam, an amateur DJ and Manchester United fan, was met by a large crowd of family and friends including his sister Katie who said: “I have really missed Adam, from Peverell. He really loved it out there and kept telling us that when he was phoning home.” Adam’s best friend Lara said: “It I so great to have him back again. Life hasn’t been the same without him.”

Lieutenant Commander James McLellan, the ship’s weapons engineering officer, was reacquainted on the jetty with his first child again, his son Thomas, who was born 12 weeks ago during the ship’s deployment. James said: “I was allowed to see Thomas for a week after he was born but had to go back to my ship, so it is extra special to come back and be met by my new little family. The deployment was a great success and I was proud to be part of it. Now I have to learn new skills, like nappy changing and bottle feeding, a contrast to weapons!”

His wife Emma, a florist with Mesher and McLellan, of Hartley, Plymouth, said: “It’s good to have us altogether as a new family again.”

HMS Campbeltown has worked extremely hard since leaving Devonport in October last year. The first few months of the deployment, up until the turn of the year, were spent conducting Operation Calash which involves patrolling the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden areas in the drive towards countering international terrorism.

HMS Campbeltown’s commanding officer, Commander Gordon Abernethy said: “This has been a really challenging deployment. The ship and the ship’s company are a real asset and have made a significant impact in countering global terrorism and working towards getting Iraq stabilised again. We have all missed our families tremendously, they have given us all a great deal of support, but know that we have an important job to do and the ship’s company should feel proud of what we have achieved.”
He said the Iraqi navy was now being rebuilt and retrained with the help of the Royal Navy after the shattering blow of the Iraq war.

Since the turn of the year Campbeltown has been part of Operation Telic, as part of a
multi-national coalition task force that protects the Iraqi oil platforms, which generate 95% of the nations income. The main role provides 24-hour-a-day security for 365 days a year in congested water where traffic ranges from small fishing dhows up to vast oil tankers. The task force is also working hard to assist and train the Iraqi Navy to eventually assume the same role.

The ship’s company did get the chance to take some rest and recuperation during the deployment, notably a 12-day stand off in Dubai where the ship conducted a maintenance period while many of the crew also flew family and friends out to meet them. A popular feature was an indoor ski centre with many of the ship’s company taking the unexpected chance to learn to ski in the Middle East.

Most of the time deployed has been at sea but HMS Campbeltown ship has also taken part in football, rugby and hockey during port visits against local teams.

The sailors raised funds for the various charities through events such as ‘Row the Suez’ and a 24-hour ‘liftathon’. ‘Row the Suez Canal’ involves rowing on a rowing machine continuously for a ‘distance’ of 162 km, equivalent to the length of the canal, to raise money for Cancer Research UK. Eight members of the warrant officers’ and chief petty officers’ mess also staged a 24-hour ‘Liftathon’, a weight-lifting endurance event, lifting
about 1,075 tonnes with each lifter completing 60,000 lifts. The events raised £1,898 for Granby Island Community Centre, who support under-privileged local children and youngsters in Devonport, Plymouth.

After 29,100 miles and 221 days away HMS Campbeltown and her ship’s company are be pleased to return home to Devonport. The crew will enjoy their leave before the ship undertakes a maintenance period to prepare her for a busy operating programme between now and entering refit in November.


HMS Campbeltown homecoming. [Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Mar 3 Juin 2008 - 10:22

2nd Jun 2008

HMS Cumberland prepares for Operational Sea Training

HMS Cumberland returned last week from her operational stand off in Gibraltar and is now working towards being fully prepared for her package of Operational Sea Training (OST), which commences today (2 Jun 08 ).

Cumberland’s eight week OST package will consist of an initial basic phase, both in harbour and at sea, followed by intermediate and advanced phases. Cumberland then moves into Directed Continuation Training (DCT) which gives theatre specific training for the operational environment into which the Ship will deploy. The training takes place in Devonport and the South Coast Exercise Areas during June and July.

OST training is conducted in a fictional context into which all training serials are set. Plymouth is renamed as the ‘Brownian’ enclave of Freeport, adjacent to the hostile State of ‘Ginger’.

For many of the Ship’s Company this will be their first taste of OST and so the coming months will involve a lot of hard work and determination. This is tempered with the knowledge that, once the training is completed, Cumberland will be prepared to the very high standard required for an operational deployment.


HMS Cumberland [Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Jeu 12 Juin 2008 - 14:09

10th Jun 2008

Iraqi Forces begin to take responsibility in the Gulf

Thanks to mentoring and training from Coalition Forces, Iraqi Forces now have responsibility themselves for the defence of some aspects of the Iraqi oil terminals which HMS Chatham currently protects.

Royal Navy frigate HMS Chatham assumed responsibility for maritime security duties in the Gulf in May 2008, maintaining the Royal Navy's ongoing presence in the region.

And Commodore Duncan Potts (Royal Navy), embarked on HMS Chatham, is in command of the Coalition Force, Combined Task Force 158, whose remit is to maintain lawful use of the maritime environment and deny it as a venue for illegal activity.

The main focus of Task Force 158 is to protect Iraq's two oil terminals, the Khawr Al Amaya and the Al Basra, as well as the Iraqi Offshore Oil Infrastructure. Coalition Forces work alongside their Iraqi Navy and Marine counterparts ensuring that oil continues to flow from Iraq, generating national income from the export market.

The Coalition Forces are also focussed on training the growing Iraqi Navy and Marines so that Iraq can eventually take full responsibility for its offshore security.

This enduring commitment is making good progress, with Iraqi Forces now taking responsibility for the defence of some aspects of both oil terminals. The Iraqi Navy and Marine boarding teams (trained and mentored by the Coalition) are also now fully engaged with security sweeps of tankers arriving on a daily basis in the deep water anchorages, waiting to take on oil from the terminals.

This operation transitioned to Iraqi control in April 2008. When the Head of the Iraqi Navy, Admiral Jawad, visited the Khawr Al Amaya oil terminal he was quick to offer his thanks to the Coalition Forces for their help, saying: "Maybe we won't remember each man after three or four years but we will remember your countries - when you helped my country during this critical time. My appreciation and thanks to you and your families."

HMS Chatham and the other Coalition and Iraqi vessels continually patrol a 3,000-metre exclusion zone around each of the oil platforms and also provide security 24-hours-a-day, 365-days-a-year, to the congested area of the Gulf, where the traffic ranges from small fishing dhows to vast oil tankers.

The Task Force consists of at least two Frigates or Destroyers, four Patrol Boats, Iraqi Patrol Boats, an Afloat Support Base (Royal Fleet Auxiliary Cardigan Bay), and a number of helicopters, and works in close proximity to the Iran-Iraq and Kuwait-Iraq national borders.

HMS Chatham was actually the venue of choice for hosting a meeting between the Heads of the Iraqi and Kuwaiti Navies and the Kuwaiti Coast Guard. A high profile event and the first since 1991, the intent was to introduce a series of maritime protocols to enhance co-operation and co-ordination between the two countries, and improve the safety and security for mariners operating in the region.

Commodore Potts said: "The Iraqi and Kuwaiti Navy have been trying to meet like this for some time, in this case CTF 158 made it happen. I think warm relationships were established and we were also able to start to put in place some confidence-building measures for the Kuwaiti Navy, Coast Guard and the Iraqi Navy to use in their congested waters. All this must be good for regional security and stability between two neighbours."

The constant stream of traffic in the area, travelling to and from the port of Umm Qasr and Iranian ports along the Shatt Al Arab, coupled with the high level of fishing activity, makes for a busy maritime environment.

In April 2008 a Task Group of Mine Counter Measures Vessels was added to this busy picture, tasked with clearing the declared Mine Danger Areas (MDA) of historic ordnance from the areas immediately around the oil platforms, the Khawr Abd Allah waterway and its approaches, and off the coast of Kuwait.

At the invitation of the Governments of Iraqi and Kuwait, and with the full support of the Kuwaiti and Iraqi Navies, all MDAs were cleared following approximately 200 dives and over 100 runs by remotely operated submersible vehicles. The MDAs will be reclassified as 'Former Mine Danger Areas'.

Current visitors to the oil platforms and ships though are the thousands of migratory birds streaming north from Africa and Asia, making a pit stop before continuing north to their breeding grounds. Besides the scientific interest, with 70 species recorded, a number of personnel have found themselves to be impromptu perches, as birds settled on hands, heads, and feet after the arduous flight across the Gulf.


HMS Chatham's Royal Marines head off to carry out a tanker sweep in the deep water anchorage near the Al Basra Iraqi oil terminal [Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Lun 7 Juil 2008 - 21:53

7th Jul 2008

HMS Chatham A Coalition Command Platform In The Northern Arabian Gulf

HMS Chatham is on patrol in the Northern Arabian Gulf and has served as the flagship to the Royal Navy in command of Combined Task Force 158 over the past two months. The Devonport-based Type 22 frigate is a fully equipped Command Platform and Commander Task Force 158 Commodore Duncan Potts has been embarked with elements of his Battle Staff.

“It is a Coalition effort, but without a doubt the Royal Navy is a major player in Iraqi Territorial Waters. We’ve had the frigates HMS Campbeltown and HMS Chatham, which have been very much the back-stop to the local command and control and force protection; both units have done extremely well.”

Commander Martin Connell, the Commanding Officer of HMS Chatham said,

“Commodore Potts has chosen to command from afloat, onboard HMS Chatham, not many ships that I am aware of, certainly of a frigate size, are capable of doing that, we carry out that role routinely.”

Task Force 158 is the maritime contribution to Operation Iraqi Freedom, it is a coalition between the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom operating at the request of the Government of Iraq under a United Nations mandate. The mission is to ensure the continued protection of Iraqi’s vital offshore oil infrastructure and the integrity of Iraq’s territorial waters. Maritime Security Operations contribute to the security of maritime trade throughout the Northern Arabian Gulf; the consequent regional stability facilitates Iraqi economic development.

The Royal Navy has been in command for the past four and half months and HMS Chatham and her Coalition partners keep an intense and sustained watch over their area of responsibility. There is a high density of merchant marine activity in the Northern Arabian Gulf amongst which potential aggressors can conceal them selves. In particular Chatham patrols the waters around the Khawr al Amaya and Al Basra oil terminals, enforcing a 3,000m exclusion zone. These platforms dispense Iraqi oil to deepwater tankers; the revenue constitutes <90% of Iraqi Gross Domestic Product. In 2004 the Coalition foiled an attempt by Al Qaeda to destroy both terminals. Chatham has also served as a neutral platform for a number of historic meetings between the Iraqi and Kuwait Navy and Coast Guard who are developing new protocols for working along their maritime boarder.

Chatham has a contingent of Royal Marines embarked from the Fleet Rifle Stand-by Rifle Troop who conduct security sweeps of the oil tankers arriving at the terminals and merchant shipping and fishing dhows in the area. The ship’s Mk8 Lynx flies reconnaissance patrols and can fast-rope the Royal Marines anywhere that they are required.

Chatham received world-wide recognition for her humanitarian efforts in the aftermath of the Tsunami on 26 Dec 2004. Chatham was also present at the handover of Hong Kong, starred in the BBC series ‘Shipmates’ and was the lead ship in the Trafalgar 200 Celebrations.


HMS Chatham on her way to the Arabian Gulf [Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Sam 4 Oct 2008 - 13:24

2nd Oct 2008

Cumberland in Exercise Noble Midas

Plymouth Royal Navy frigate HMS Cumberland is planning for a major multinational exercise in the Mediterranean.

HMS Cumberland has left the Eastern Mediterranean and has completed the initial work up phase of the Standing Nato Maritime Group 2 Deployment- a multinational task group of naval ships.

The ship spent a night in the Sicilian port of Catania before sailing for Exercise Noble Midas, which is being held in the Adriatic and Mediterranean Seas between Italy and Greece with the task group.

Exercise Noble Midas is an annual two-week exercise in the Mediterranean involving ships from NATO. There are over 30 ships involved from Bulgaria, France, Germany, Greece, Netherlands, Romania, Spain, Turkey, UK and the US. The UK ships are HMS Roebuck from Devonport, HMS Ledbury, HMS Cumberland and a submarine. The exercise is focussed on a mock political dispute on a fictitious Mediterranean island. The exercise includes operational scenarios with anti-submarine and air defence exercises.

In Catania teams from HMS Cumberland met other ships from across the task group to discuss the programme and plans for the exercise. The ship’s crew took a break to visit the historic town in the shadow of Europe’s largest volcano, Mount Etna, and sampled Italian dishes, before a lengthy time at sea in defence watches which are a series of watchkeeping duties under a strict regime.

HMS Cumberland left her baseport in Devonport on 29 August 2008 to patrol the Mediterranean and Arabian Gulf and is due to return before Christmas.


HMS Cumberland in formation with SNMG2 [Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Dim 12 Oct 2008 - 18:16

Egyptians enjoy a swim in the Suez Canal on the first day of the Eid el Fitr celebrations as the British destroyer HMS Chatham passes through the canal on its way to the Mediterranean Sea, Ismailia, Egypt, 01 October 2008. Muslims around the world celebrate the end of the month of Ramadan with outtings and family gatherings. The Suez Canal and the clubs along it are a popular place for locals to swim and enjoy themselves.


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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Dim 12 Oct 2008 - 18:17

3rd Oct 2008

Devonport Frigate's Poignant Visit to France

HMS Campbeltown has been renewing her close links with her ‘twinned’ communities in Scotland after a wartime memorial duty in France.

The ship then sailed for her namesake town Campbeltown, Scotland, where she hosted a reception onboard and took affiliates to sea for the day for them to experience life in the Royal Navy. Whilst tied up alongside a jetty the ship also provided a working party to construct a path and decking area for a local care home and 30 sailors also helped with a beach clean and were thanked by a thankyou barbecue.

HMS Campbeltown had previously visited St. Nazaire in France, one of the ship’s Battle Honours due to its crucial role in Operation Chariot in March 1942. Sailing with the ship were members of the St. Nazaire Association including Nick and Tim Beattie, whose father commanded an earlier ship also called HMS Campbeltown during the operation, and Mr Steven Barney who took part in the raid onboard HMS Atherstone. In 1942, the then HMS Campbeltown, disguised as a German warship, rammed the lock gates in St. Nazaire making them in-operable to the Germans, resulting in no deep water dock facility on the Atlantic coast to repair damaged warships.

During the visit the ship participated in a memorial service for all those who lost their lives during the daring mission, followed by a reception at the Town Hall.

Her Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Commander Colin Williams Royal Navy, said: “It has been a great honour to command such a fine warship. After what has been a very busy period for the ship with a lot of time away on operations, we are now completing preparations prior to commencing our refit.

“The majority of the ship’s company will shortly be leaving, which is always a sad occasion having proved they are such an effective team. They will now be assigned to different ships leaving a crew of about 35 to look after the ship in Scotland. We are now looking forward to our return to Devonport, towards the end of next year, having completed a successful refit and regeneration and ready to meet the challenges that lie ahead.”

HMS Campbeltown is now due to sail to Rosyth for her year-long multi-million pound refit. Having returned from the Gulf earlier this year, she has also spent the last couple of months undergoing pre-refit trials and assessments. The refit will include upgrades of some weapons systems and machinery and cover essential maintenance which can only be conducted whilst in dry-dock.


HMS Campbeltown Passing under Forth bridge [Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Mar 21 Oct 2008 - 10:03

20th Oct 2008

HMS Chatham Returns Home from Drug Busting Patrol

HMS Chatham, the Plymouth-based Royal Navy frigate is due to return home to a warm welcome on Wednesday (22 October) after seven months protecting Iraqi offshore oil platforms, policing maritime traffic and making a huge illegal drugs seizure.

The ship is expected to be greeted by 800 friends and families on the jetty and a Royal Marines Band. HMS Chatham has been conducting maritime security operations in her deployment to the North of the Persian Gulf in support of United Nations Security Council. The ship has been protecting 2 huge oil terminals, the Al Basrah Oil Terminal and Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal. The output of these terminals accounts for over 90% of Iraq’s income and their protection is therefore essential for both the future of Iraq and wider regional stability.

The crew of over 250 have been professionally going about their business in oppressive conditions that have reached 50°C and 100% humidity with both people and equipment coping admirably. The ship was the flagship for the commodore of combined task force controlling maritime forces in the area. And was the neutral venue for meeting of the heads of the Iraqi Navy, Kuwait Navy and Kuwait coastguard, their first since before the first Gulf War, in order to plan regional security.

HMS Chatham’s commanding officer, Commander Martin Connell said: “After almost seven months deployed on operations, the Ship’s Company and I are very much looking forward to returning home and being reunited with our families. We have had a most successful deployment, kept oil flowing out of Iraq, helped foster relations in the area, succeeded in anti-narcotics operations and done so in challenging and demanding conditions.

“I am extremely proud of my ship’s company and they can now proceed on some well-earned leave with their heads held high.”

He paid tribute to the support his crew have had from home: “It’s true, we have spent a lot of time away, with 11 of the last 13 months being spent at sea and that is hard on my sailors and their families.

Whether it has been helping to protect Iraqi waters, successfully taking part in the anti-narcotics fight, giving reassurance against piracy, playing a role in the future of NATO or furthering coalition relations, the fact this has all been done in the space of a year speaks volumes.”

HMS Chatham’s boarding teams were involved in a huge drugs bust having spent two days searching for a suspected drug runner. The ship’s Lynx helicopter finally found the smugglers’ boat and the ship’ s Royal Marines and boarding team secured the vessel. They then had the challenging task of searching the bilges surrounded by oil, sewerage, rats and cockroaches, to be rewarded by finding six tonnes of high grade hashish hidden away after an operation lasting over 18 hours.

The drugs proved to have links back to insurgent elements in Afghanistan and their disposal helped deny vital funding to terrorist forces.

The ship also provided security and reassurance for a number of vessels during anti-piracy operations and received a letter of thanks for her actions from the Secretary General of the International Maritime Organization.

By the time HMS Chatham reaches home she will have been away from home for 11 of the last 13 months; Before her Gulf deployment, she sailed to the Mediterranean to participate in Operation Active Endeavour, providing maritime security over a wide region. She also took part in huge 40-ship exercises before then.

Also on the Devonport jetty will be a brand new car to be collected by a lucky member of the crew in a prize charity draw, following a number of charity events they conducted to raise over £17,000.

The majority of Chatham’s crew are then due to enjoy well-deserved leave. The ship will undergo maintenance.


HMS Chatham [Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Ven 24 Oct 2008 - 10:21

23rd Oct 2008

HMS Chatham Home to a Warm Welcome after Drug Busting Patrol

Hundreds of families and friends cheered the sailors of HMS Chatham as they arrived home at HM Naval Base Devonport yesterday (22 October) after a successful seven-month patrol.

The jetty was crowded with happy well-wishers waving banners and a Royal Marine Band as the Royal Navy frigate tied up after protecting Iraqi offshore oil platforms, policing maritime traffic, deterring pirates and making a huge illegal drugs seizure.

As soon as a he stepped on shore Petty Officer (Weapons) Jon Dodd, 29, was enthusiastically hugged and kissed by his wife Katherine Dodd and their three daughters twins Lily and Poppy, aged two and a half, and Erin, five. He said: “It is fantastic to be home again. I have missed my wife and family so much.

“I was responsible for the missile side of things and therefore, part of the team keeping responsible for force protection - keeping the ship safe. We achieved a lot in difficult conditions and have made a difference out there in the Arabian Gulf and Gulf of Aden. We were on alert for much of the time, there was little down time, little relaxation when at duty stations. But I was very rewarding.”

Jon has previously served in HMS Cornwall, HMS Cumberland, both Devonport ships, and the former HMS Coventry.

Katherine, who came from Burgess Hill, Sussex, with her family to meet her husband, said: “I have missed him very much and so have the children. The twins were a lot younger, relatively speaking, when they last saw him.

“It has been hard without Jon. There have been texts and a few phone calls, but it is difficult to remain in contact at such a great distance when we are both busy. But he has been doing a difficult and important job.”

Leading Aircraft Controller Alex Blake, 24, was almost speechless with happiness when he saw his first child Jake, aged only three weeks, for the first time on the jetty. As he delicately cuddled his son he

said: “It is a marvellous feeling to hold my first child for the first time. It is an indescribable feeling. I don’t know what else to say, except I have been looking forward so much to this moment for months.

“The deployment was very busy and hard. I was working with our own Lynx helicopter, landing it on and off and working with other aircraft, including fixed wing from other nations’ navies. It was challenging but rewarding, exactly why I joined the Royal Navy.”

Alex’s girlfriend and Jake’s mother Simone Blunden, of Pulborough, Sussex, 28, said: “Jake’s so lovely and it’s wonderful to see him in the arms of his father for the first time. I have missed Alex, especially being pregnant and having a new baby. But he is back now and the family is complete.”

The ship has been operating North of the Persian Gulf in support of United Nations Security Council protecting 2 huge oil terminals, the Al Basrah Oil Terminal and Khawr Al Amaya Oil Terminal. The output of these terminals accounts for over 90% of Iraq’s income and their protection is therefore essential for both the future of Iraq and wider regional stability.

The crew of over 250 have been professionally going about their business in oppressive conditions that have reached 50°C and 100% humidity with both people and equipment coping admirably. The ship was the flagship for the commodore of combined task force controlling maritime forces in the area. And was the neutral venue for meeting of the heads of the Iraqi Navy, Kuwait Navy and Kuwait coastguard, their first since before the first Gulf War, in order to plan regional security.

HMS Chatham’s commanding officer, Commander Martin Connell said: “After almost seven months deployed on operations, the ship’s company and I are very much looking forward to returning home and being reunited with our families. We have had a most successful deployment, kept oil flowing out of Iraq, helped foster relations in the area, succeeded in anti-narcotics operations and done so in challenging and demanding conditions.

“I am extremely proud of my ship’s company and they can now proceed on some well-earned leave with their heads held high.”

He paid tribute to the support his crew have had from home: “It’s true, we have spent a lot of time away, with 11 of the last 13 months being spent at sea and that is hard on my sailors and their families.

Whether it has been helping to protect Iraqi waters, successfully taking part in the anti-narcotics fight, giving reassurance against piracy, playing a role in the future of NATO or furthering coalition relations, the fact this has all been done in the space of a year speaks volumes.”

HMS Chatham’s boarding teams were involved in a huge drugs bust having spent two days searching for a suspected drug runner. The ship’s Lynx helicopter finally found the smugglers’ boat and the ship’s Royal Marines and boarding team secured the vessel. They then had the challenging task of searching the bilges surrounded by oil, sewerage, rats and cockroaches, to be rewarded by finding six tonnes of high grade hashish hidden away after an operation lasting over 18 hours.

The drugs proved to have links back to insurgent elements in Afghanistan and their disposal helped deny vital funding to terrorist forces.

The ship also provided security and reassurance for a number of vessels during anti-piracy operations and received a letter of thanks for her actions from the Secretary General of the International Maritime Organization.

The majority of Chatham’s crew are then due to enjoy well-deserved leave. The ship will undergo maintenance.


HMS Chatham Returns Home from Drug Busting Patrol [Picture: Royal Navy]

Source: Royal Navy

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MessageSujet: HMS Cumberland (F85) leaving Gibraltar   Mar 16 Déc 2008 - 12:08

HMS Cumberland (F85) : Leaving Gibraltar. 15/12/2008


by J J Fernandez sur shipspotting.com

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Dernière édition par olivier le Mer 18 Jan 2012 - 10:26, édité 1 fois
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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Ven 10 Mar 2017 - 23:43

https://twitter.com/TeamRN1/status/840318734703161345

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Sam 11 Mar 2017 - 0:13

https://twitter.com/TeamRN1/status/840300766174818304

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MessageSujet: Re: Type 22 Class frigate   Sam 11 Mar 2017 - 9:36

https://twitter.com/TeamRN1/status/840469146441777153

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